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External Threat Management Labs

For Threat Actors, Shadow Z118 is the Kit That Keeps on Giving

For several years, researchers have tracked a phishing kit authored by an actor known as Shadow Z118. Unlike many traditional phishing kits designed only to steal credentials, a handful of the observed Shadow Z118 kits also steal victim identities, payment, and even verify the legitimacy of entered credit information under the false pretext of verifying a user for "security purposes." 

Shadow Z118 kits have been active since at least 2017, and Johannes B. Ullrich at SANS has analyzed it here. The kit's occasional focus on stealing a user's identity and credit information, known as 'Fullz,' sets it apart and has earned it a strong reputation as an effective solution for criminals. 

Since the kit initially appeared, there have been multiple iterations, with many actors copying the original version to create unique variants. RiskIQ's threat research team analyzed several of these variants. In most cases, the phishing pages are constructed well and have multiple steps to trick users into a false sense of security.

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External Threat Management

RiskIQ is Illuminating the Global Attack Surface With Next-Gen Security Intelligence

For many of us, what draws us into cybersecurity is that original promise of the internet—bringing people together. That idea of creating connections across the world and making sure those connections are safe is something worth defending every single day. 

Recently, that promise has come into jeopardy like never before. There have been over a dozen 0days in the past few months alone. We're just months removed from SolarWinds, an unprecedented attack in the level of privilege and access to networks. Since then, we've dealt with the Microsoft Exchange vulnerability, an incident even more significant in scale and effect, initially affecting more than 400,000 servers worldwide.

The sheer size of these attacks goes beyond our original concepts of security. In reality, these new global-scale attacks aren't a security problem; they're a big data problem that requires a new type of security intelligence. 

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External Threat Management Labs

Yanbian Gang Malware Continues with Wide-Scale Distribution and C2

Fake banking apps laced with malware continue to be an effective tool for threat actors. For the Yanbian Gang, a criminal group centered in Yanbian, China, that targets organizations across Asia, it's a craft they've been improving on for over a decade. 

The Yanbian Gang has targeted South Korean Android mobile banking customers since 2013 with malicious Android apps purporting to be from major banks, namely Shinhan Savings Bank, Saemaul Geumgo, Shinhan Finance, KB Kookmin Bank, and NH Savings Bank. RiskIQ's threat research team examined some of the threat group's more recent activity in this vector to analyze their malware of choice and the large-scale hosting infrastructure they use to distribute and control it.

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External Threat Management Labs

Agent Tesla: Malware-as-a-Service Enables Trend Analysis

For more than ten years, RiskIQ has been crawling and absorbing the internet to define the web's identity and map the relationships between its infrastructure to show customers how they, and attackers targeting them, fit within it. To continue to strengthen our Internet Intelligence Graph, RiskIQ's research team has begun analyzing popular malware families' known campaigns to fingerprint trends in threat infrastructure. 

We analyzed infrastructure that likely belongs to Agent Tesla remote access trojans (RATs) to determine commonalities and identify trends that will help us detect them. 

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External Threat Management

RiskIQ Named a Strong Performer in The Forrester Wave™: External Threat Intelligence Services, Q1 2021

The digital, cloud-centric transformation that was already enveloping the enterprise was set into overdrive by changes driven by the COVID-19 pandemic, and there's no going back.

Unfortunately, this breakneck speed in digital transformation creates significant hidden risks—global-scale vulnerabilities enable massive APT attacks like the ones against Microsoft and SolarWinds servers, and threat infrastructure hides in plain sight across the internet, meshing with the benign to remain well-hidden. Meanwhile, a surge in digital threats is fueled by global events and the advent of easy access to malicious systems, kits, and infrastructure that even novice threat actors can use to execute effective cyberattacks.

For security teams, the best defense against this new threat landscape is next-gen security intelligence that evolves as fast as the threat actors do; intelligence fortified with real-world observations of the enterprise attack surface coupled with deep insight into global threat infrastructure. 

The Forrester Wave™: External Threat Intelligence Services, Q1 2021, evaluated 12 top security intelligence vendors to educate security and risk professionals about which is right for them. Participants were judged on 26 criteria to determine rank. With RiskIQ mapping the relationships between internet infrastructure, both good and bad, for more than a decade, RiskIQ's Illuminate Platform received the highest possible scores in six criteria, including Brand Threat Intelligence, Market Approach, and Information Quality. 

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External Threat Management

A Vulnerable World: RiskIQ’s Unique View of the Microsoft Exchange Landscape

Frankly, it's a tough time to be in cybersecurity. Perhaps the toughest ever. There have been over a dozen zero-days in the past three months alone, with countless organizations across the world affected. 

We're barely four months removed from SolarWinds—a watershed attack some thought would set the standard for the impact a vulnerability could have—and already dealing with a new attack that dwarfs it in scale. While it started with espionage actors Hafnium, ESET Research shows that at least 10 APT groups have exploited Microsoft Exchange vulnerabilities. Now more are jumping in, and some organizations are seeing ransomware actors leveraging the vulnerability as well. 

With the prevalence of Microsoft Exchange servers across the global attack surface, the sheer size of this incident goes well beyond security. In reality, this is a big data problem. 

RiskIQ has continuously collected internet data for more than a decade to solve such a problem. We built our technology to help security teams handle global attacks, and we're experts at discovering attack surfaces from organizational to global in scale. Now, we're working overtime to put this vulnerability’s scope into context and help the world understand if they are exposed and enable them to respond rapidly.

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External Threat Management

Cryptocurrency: A Boom in Value Begets a Boom in Crime

When cryptocurrency value rises, we can expect a parallel rise in crypto-related crime, including phishing, fake brokers, and scams impersonating exchanges and other legitimate services. As expected, the recent surge in the global cryptocurrency market has made it a hot target for cybercrime

While the blockchain technology that protects cryptocurrency investments is robust, widespread fraud on social media and across the web circumvents those protections, targeting the general public directly to fool and ultimately rob them. As a result, keeping the pulse of the crypto-threat landscape requires an always-on, internet-wide view. At RiskIQ, we've been tracking crypto-threats to understand their prevalence and how they're evolving. 

Below, we've outlined the most prevalent that we see, including infrastructure analysis via our Internet Intelligence Graph to drill down into the mechanics of each threat and show how they work and why they're effective. 

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External Threat Management Analyst

Microsoft Exchange Server Remote Code Execution Vulnerability: RiskIQ’s Response

On March 2, 2021, Microsoft announced that four previously unknown zero-day vulnerabilities were exploited to attack on-premises versions of the Microsoft Exchange Servers.  Microsoft has reported that attackers exploited these vulnerabilities to gain access to Exchange servers, gain access to email accounts, and deploy malware (typically web shells) for long-term persistent access to victim organizations.  Microsoft credited a security company called Volexity for first observing these exploits on January 6, 2021. These vulnerabilities do not affect Microsoft Office 365 or Azure Cloud deployments of Exchange email servers.

Microsoft has reported they have attributed these attacks to a threat actor group it calls HAFNIUM and assessed it is a People’s Republic of China sponsored campaign.  Additional details of HAFNIUM targeting and attack techniques are included in Microsoft’s security blog. Meanwhile, FireEye’s analysis indicates this attack has ties activity it tracks across three unknown attack clusters and provides additional analysis and indicators in their blog.

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External Threat Management Labs

Turkey Dog Continues to Target Turkish Speakers with RAT Trojans via COVID Lures

Shortly after the COVID-19 pandemic began, there was a spike in threat infrastructure using the crisis to bait, deceive, and social engineer victims. Reports of threat campaigns attempting to fool Turkish-speaking users into downloading Android apps containing the Cerberus and Anubis banking trojans surfaced. Today, new RiskIQ data shows these attacks have not stopped, shedding light on the full extent of these campaigns. 

In May 2020, threat researcher BushidoToken authored a blog pulling together multiple indicators, some appearing as early as April 2020, from researchers tracking Cerberus and Anubis activity targeting Turkish speakers. These two remote access Trojans (RATs), which follow a malware-as-a-service model, steal user credentials to access bank accounts. Highly deceptive, they can overlay over other apps (dynamic overlays), capture keystrokes, SMS harvest and send, call forward, and access other sensitive data across the device. 

The campaigns exploited the pandemic to distribute malicious Android applications via web pages promising free internet packages to encourage people to stay home. To get the "free internet," users only had to install an application on their phones. In all, BushidoToken compiled 24 .apk filenames connected to the campaigns and a long list of domains and URLs. However, recent RiskIQ research shows these campaigns went on for much longer, with more infrastructure and tactics than outlined in May reporting.

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